Model Games for White

 

Budapest Defense

 

Keene-Haugli 1983

 

1.        1  d4 Nf6 2 c4 e5 3 de Ng4 4 Nf3 Bc5 5 e3 Nc6 6 Be2 Ngxe5 7 0-0 NxNf3+  8 BxNf3 Qh4 9 Be2 9 h5 10 Nc3 Ne5 11 Nd5 Ng4 12 h3 Bd6 13 f4! (forced) c5 14 Nc3 ++  wins a piece

 

(Raymond Keene, an Opening Repertoire for White, Collier, 1984) p 88

 

Grunfeld Defense

 

1.           1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 g6 3 Nc3 d5 4 cd Nxd5 5 Nf3 Nb7 6 Qb3!? Nb6 7 e4!? 0-0?! 8 Be2 Bg4 9 d5 c6 10 Be3 cxd5 11 exd5 BxNc3+ 12 bxBc3 Qxd5? 13 BxNb6  wins a piece because QxQb3 would mean that the undeveloped white QR pins the black QRP, and the N protects the black Q

 

(Keene, op cit, p 65)

 

King’s Indian, pseudo-Saemisch (“Kramer” variation)

 

1.     1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 g6 3 Nc3 Bg7 4 e4 d6 5 Nge2!? 00 6 Ng3 e5 7 d5 c6 8 Be2  and now 8 ..cxd5?! 9 cd a6 10 a4 Nbd7 11 h4 h5 12 Bg5 Qb6 ?! 13 a5!  Now if Qxb2 (the “poisoned pawn”) it is trapped (“stalemated”) by force before it is even attacked. 14 Bd2 Nc5 15 Ra2 Qb3 16 Qa1 followed by 00 and Rb1.  (Keene, op. cit., p. 61)   This idea of stalemating a Queen has occurred twice in my own tournament play.   

 

Here’s an important question in the King’s Indian Classical:

 

1. d4 Nf6 2 c4 g6 3 Nc3 Bg7 4 e4 0-0 5 Nf3 d6 6 Be2 e5 7 0-0 Nc6 8 d5 Ne7 9 Ne1 (still the most analyzed and probably the most dangerous) Nd7 10 Be3 f5 11 f3 f4 12 Bf2 g5 (at one time Fischer claimed this to be bad for White) 13 Nb5 (Korchnoi) and White either wins a pawn, exchange, or gets rid of the Black light square bishop. MCO-14 gives only Rc1 or Nd3 for white.  How does Black respond?  Leonid Bass, “Trends King’s Indian” 1989 6 Be2 p.Karolyi-Kupreichnik 13   a6 14 Na7 RxNa7 15 B xRa7 b6 16 b4! Nb7 16 c5! dxc5 17 Rc1 cb4 19 d6 cd6 20 Qd6 Rf6 21 Qc7 +-  and 13 … Nf6 14 Nxa7 Bd7 15 c5 RxNa7 16 cxd6 Nc8 17 dxc7 Qc7 18 BxRa7 NxBa7 19 Qb3! +-(Benjamin-Nunn 1988) and Whites passers here are worth more than the two pieces for a rook   

 

Nimzo Indian, Leningrad

 

1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 Bb4 4 Bg5 h6 5 Bh4 c5 6 d5 exd5 7 cxd5 d6 8 e3 Nbd7 9 Bd3 0-0 10 Ne2 Ne5 11 0-0 Bxc3 12 Nxc3 Ng6 13 Bg3 Qe7 14 e4 Ng4 15 h3 N4e5 16 f4! (Soltis, Winning With 1 d4, Dallas, Chess Digest, 1988).

                                 

 

Queens Gambit Accepted

 

1.   1 d4 d5 2 c4 dxc4 3 Nf3 Nf6 4 e3 e6 5 Bxc4 c5 6 Qe2!? (commits to a gambit) a6 7 dxc5 Bxc5 8 e4 Nc6 9 0-0 Ng4 10 e5 Nd4 11 NxNd4 QxNd4 12 Nd2! Nxe5 (now “winning” the pawn) 13 Nb3 Qxc4 14 QxNe5 (attack the B) Bf8 15 Be3 (GefandSalov, 1996) f6 16 Qh5+ g6 17 Qf3 +-   White has many threats.  If now 0-0 White threatens Qxb7 and Bh6 setting up unstoppable mate.   MCO 14, de Firmian, p 447 (McKay, 1999) 

 

Benko Gambit

 

Piket-Topalov 1999: 1 d4  Nf6 2 c4 c5 3 d5 b5 4 cxb5 a6  5 bxa6 g6 6 Nc3 Bxa6 7 Nf3 Bg7 8 g3 d6 9 Bg2 Nbd7 10 0-0 0-0 11 Rb1! Nb6 12 b3 Ra7 13 a4! Qa8 14 Nh4 Rb8 15 Bb2 Nbd7 16 Ba1 Ne5 17 Qc2 Rab7 18 Rfd1 Qa7 19 Bf1 Ne8 20 Ne4 Rb6 21 Nd2! Nd7 22 Bxg7 Kxg7 23 Nhf3 Nef6 24 e4 Rb4 25 Bza6 Qza6 26 Nc4 +-  White has an ideal position against the Benko and has made his position “fireproof.”  (Byron Jacobs and Andrew Kinsman, The Benko Gambit, London: Batsford, 1999, p. 50)  Is the Benko really sound at the highest levels?  Why don’t we see it in match play?  What if Black delays castling and plays for pressure on d5 one move sooner?  Some day the Blair Witch people will just have to make a movie called “The Benko Gambit.” It used to take some pluck to play it.

 

Queen’s Gambit Declined: Exchange Variation  (back in the 60s Hans Berliner used to claim that Black cannot equalize, such were the statements of Queen Pawn players)

 

1. d4 d5 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 Nf6 4 cd ed 5 Bg5 Nbd7 6 e3 (Nxd5?? Is jejune) c6 7 Bd3 Be7 8 Qc2 00 9 Nge2 Re8 10 000 Ne4 11 Bxe4 de 12 h4 f5 13 Qb3+ Kh8 14 Nf4 Nf6? (Nf8) 15 h5 Nd5 16 Bxe7 Nxe7 17 Nxg6+ Nxg6 18 hg Be6 19 Rxh7+ Kg8 20 d5 cxd 21 Nxd5 Rc8+ 22 Kb1 Qg5 23 Rdh1 Qxg6 24 Rh8+ followed by Qxb7 Spielmann-Thomas 1920 (Keene, p. 35)

 

For 1 e4 players here’s an important idea against the Winawer French:

 

1 e4 e6 2 d4 d5 3 Nc3 Bb4 4 e5 Qd7 5 a3 BxNc3+ 6 bxc3 b6 7 Qg4 f5 8 Qg3 Ba6!? (…Nc6) 9 BxBa6 Nxa6 10 Ne2! Nb8 11 Nf4 Nc6 12 Nxe6! Qxe6 13 Qxg7 Qg6 14 QxRh8 0-0-0 15 Be3 (Moles) Rd7  threatening to “checkmate” the Queen with … h5 and Rh7—again the idea of having the Queen trapped even when it is not yet directly attacked!)  and John Watson (in Play the French, Pergamon, 1984, p. 190) thinks that Black is winning. But ECO gives 16 0-0-0 h5 17 g4! (Schmid) and it seems White stays up an Exchange in all variations. For example: fxg 17 f4!! Intending f5 or Rg1 depending on what Black does. Ideas anyone?  (I wonder about this one…It’s not in MCO 14  Jboushka@aol.com)

 

Here’s another question for 1 e4 players

 

How should Black answer the DELRD (Delayed Ruy Lopez Deferred)

 

1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Mc6 3 Bb5 a6 4 Ba4 Nd6 5 0-0 Be7 6 BxNc3!? Bxc3 (since d x c6 opening lines rapidly is no longer possible) and now L.M. Pickett (in his 1975 Chess Player booklet) claims that White always comes out on top with 7 Nc3, intending to use the Kingside majority and play against the doubled pawns. Examples 7…B g4 8 a3 BxNf3 9 QxBf3 Qd6 10 d3 0-0-0 11 Qe2  or the sacrifice-refutation 8… Bh5 9 g4! Nxg4 10 hxN Bxg4 11 Kg2 +- or 9… Bg6 10 Nxe4 Nxe5 11 Re1! +- If Black exchanges the QN, the pressure on the QN file becomes irresistible. MCO 14 p 68 considers only 7 d3, 7 Qe1, 7 Qe2 all as OK for Black.

 

 

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